Archive for ‘Fasman’s Finds’

April 22, 2021

Fasman’s Finds –

Fasman’s Finds is our column from Rebecca Fasman (intrepid record nerd, DJ, and curator at the Kinsey Institute) in which she shares what she’s listening to and why. 

Light in the Attic released a third, weirder, less categorizable compilation in their Japan Archival Series. The series consists of Kankyō Ongaku: Japanese Ambient, Environmental & New Age Music 1980–1990 and Pacific Breeze: Japanese City Pop, AOR & Boogie 1976–1986 (which are both equally perfect in their well-defined scope), and now Somewhere Between: Mutant Pop, Electronic Minimalism & Shadow Sounds of Japan, 1980–1988.

Each track has at least a toe if not a whole foot in at least one different genre, but the end result is something that is so deeply invested in experimentation that it defies labels. It’s refreshing to hear, since we are bombarded with overproduced music that sounds similar across multiple genres. The tracks on this compilation are great and weird and the more you listen the less weird they get and the more you want more. 

The track I’ve selected, Area by Neo Museum, has a goth-y dark synth austerity that I can’t stop listening to. 

April 15, 2021

Fasman’s Finds – Tierra Whack

Fasman’s Finds is our column from Rebecca Fasman (intrepid record nerd, DJ, and curator at the Kinsey Institute) in which she shares what she’s listening to and why. 

Tierra Whack is a rapper from Philadelphia whose 2018 album Whack World is a masterpiece and if it’s not in your regular rotation, it should be. Her new single “Link” came out recently and the song and associated video are all about connection, something we (maybe I am projecting) all need more than ever right now. The video was made with LEGO, and Tierra Whack worked with public school students in Philly to help make the video. The lightness of the song, the ease, fun, and sweetness of the video makes me both wistful for past times and hopeful for future ones, which is a feeling I haven’t felt in a while. 

April 8, 2021

Fasman’s Finds – Odunsi

Fasman’s Finds is our column from Rebecca Fasman (intrepid record nerd, DJ, and curator at the Kinsey Institute) in which she shares what she’s listening to and why. 

Now that it’s spring, I want to listen to music that’s lighter, that makes me move, that makes me want to be outside, that reminds me of having a body and being part of larger ecosystems. I’ve been listening to Everything You Heard Is True by Odunsi (The Engine). It’s a synth-y, percussive, spacey RnB album and I can’t get enough of it right now. 

Odunsi is really good at creating space on a track – some of the percussive elements sound like breath (you can hear it clearly in Shuga Rush but really it’s throughout the whole album), and there’s welcome space between the exhalations. In a season of rebirth and rediscovery, it’s refreshing for breath and the body to be so present on an album. 

April 1, 2021

Fasman’s Finds – Analog Africa

Fasman’s Finds is our column from Rebecca Fasman (intrepid record nerd, DJ, and curator at the Kinsey Institute) in which she shares what she’s listening to and why. 

Short and sweet this week! Everything that Analog Africa puts out is pretty incredible and this most recent release, Edo Funk Explosion Vol 1, is no exception. You will be moving and shaking from beginning to end. The vibes are right, the season is right, go get your life right and buy this. 

March 25, 2021

Fasman’s Finds – Hiroshi Yoshimura

Fasman’s Finds is our column from Rebecca Fasman (intrepid record nerd, DJ, and curator at the Kinsey Institute) in which she shares what she’s listening to and why. 

It’s been a little over a year of Covid-19 lockdowns. A year of sickness and fear and death and not having access to the ways we usually deal with those things. I’ve been particularly tired/overtaxed this past week, and don’t want to listen to anything with words, or anything fast, or anything that has a traditional song structure. And so I’ve been dipping into one of my favorite albums of all time, Hiroshi Yoshimura‘s Music for Nine Postcards. This album is from 1982, and Hiroshi wrote it to correspond to 9 windows at the Hara Museum in Tokyo, where the album was first played in person. 

There is something so special to the iterative concept of this album; Yoshimura is the center, and as his views change, so do his moods, moving from melancholy to sweet, humble to excited, desirous to content. Though it all, he demonstrates such consideration, care, and love for this space, both architectural space and the sonic space he creates. I can’t say enough good things about all of Yoshimura’s work, but as this is the first album I heard of his, this holds a special place in my heart/brain/body. Hope it will in yours too. 

March 18, 2021

Fasman’s Finds – Shawna

Fasman’s Finds is our column from Rebecca Fasman (intrepid record nerd, DJ, and curator at the Kinsey Institute) in which she shares what she’s listening to and why. 

Here are two things I love: hip hop and award shows. I am deeply invested in the former, and unbelievably embarrassed by the latter. But there I was, watching the Grammy’s, which were oddly not a complete train wreck like usual, and almost crying with joy when Megan Thee Stallion and Cardi B performed together. I spent the next few days listening to some of my most favorite women rappers (and also occasionally thinking/laughing about Ben Shapiro committing the biggest and most hilarious self-own when he said that he thinks a WAP would constitute a medical condition). 

I want to highlight a gem from Shawnna, a Chicago MC who was signed to Ludacris’ label and put out her album Block Music in 2006. Her most well-known song is “Gettin’ Some”, which you can listen to below, but I also highly recommend “Hit the Back/Slide In”. And, while we’re talking recommendations, it’s always a good time to revisit Gangsta Boo, Trina, MC Lyte, Remy Ma, Khia, Foxy Brown, Lil’ Kim, and all the other talented women who paved the way for Megan Thee Stallion and Cardi B to make the world a better, wetter place. 

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March 11, 2021

Fasman’s Finds – Chronic Mncher

Fasman’s Finds is our column from Rebecca Fasman (intrepid record nerd, DJ, and curator at the Kinsey Institute) in which she shares what she’s listening to and why. 

I have fully accepted that I love sludgey things. I love sludgey metal, sludgey hip hop, sludgey electro, sludgey funk, give me anything that is grimey and I want to live in it and rub it on my face. This week’s song is no exception. The track “Flutez” by Chronic Mncher starts off super clean, almost dreamy, and pretty quickly moves into a dirty atmospheric world of sexy French people at an auto-shop (at least this is where my head went, LISTEN TO THE SONG and you’ll see what I mean, it’s cinematic!). 

Sexy French car mechanics fantasies aside, I really like this whole EP. I mean this in the best possible way – this EP sounds like if Air, T. Raumschmiere, and Gorillaz had a baby with great taste, and we all know discerning babies are the best babies. I found myself turning it on over and over again and it always was an energizing, focusing listen. 

March 4, 2021

Fasman’s Finds – Black Monument Ensemble

Fasman’s Finds is our column from Rebecca Fasman (intrepid record nerd, DJ, and curator at the Kinsey Institute) in which she shares what she’s listening to and why. 

Black Monument Ensemble is a group of artists, musicians, dancers, and singers led by Chicago-based creative force Damon Locks. Their new album, NOW, comes out digitally April 9th and on vinyl on July 9th. This album was recorded in a few takes outside at Chicago’s Experimental Sound Studio at the end of the summer of 2020.

The first single from the new album, “NOW (Forever Momentary Space),” takes you on a journey. It begins with two quotes, one about this being the beginning and not the end, and one of a woman reminiscing about a dream she had in which she was running through a green forest, laughing and dancing with a friend/partner and both of them exchanging “I love yous”. As this quote ends, you hear what sounds like telephone buttons being pressed. Communication and joy undergird this song; you can hear it in the way the song builds, highlighting one incredible performer after another, coming together in a swell and slowly fading to the sound of cicadas, also communicating with one another (the cicada chirp is a mating call from male to female cicadas).

Knowing how, when, and where the album was recorded makes this exchange between performers all the more special; through this pandemic, we have largely been removed not only from live performances, but from collaborative, communal joy. This track is a welcome shock to the system, a necessary reminder that happiness, grief, dreams, creativity, love, and humanity in general are always best served through connection, and, most importantly, that a better future depends on it. 

February 25, 2021

Fasman’s Finds – Mars

Fasman’s Finds is our column from Rebecca Fasman (intrepid record nerd, DJ, and curator at the Kinsey Institute) in which she shares what she’s listening to and why. 

This week brings us an audio file that is the first of its kind – a recording taken from the surface of another planet. NASA has previously created a kind of imagined sonic landscape for each planet based on recordings from “interactions of charged electromagnetic particles from the solar wind, ionisphere, and planetary magnetosphere.” I don’t know what that means but y’all are smart, I trust that it’s not someone just farting into a fan. 

Now this audio recording, which, upon further research, was taken with “A COMMERCIAL, OFF-THE-SHELF DEVICE”…wait. I’m sorry. The fuck? Off-WHOSE-shelf? Radioshack? Best Buy? I MUST KNOW. I am confused/miffed/heated about why they didn’t get a fancy microphone built since everything else on this rover is engineered AF but cool cool, sound doesn’t matter that much to NASA, apparently. Whew…OK fine. Y’all are smart, like I said, you must have your reasons, and now we have the first audio recording of Mars, which is so cool…and I can’t wait to hear what it sounds like with some state-of-the-art recording equipment. Anyways, listen to 18 seconds of the surface of Mars. Despite my hemming and hawing about the methods used to procure it, it is very cool and eerie and mind-blowing to hear what another planet sounds like. 

https://mars.nasa.gov/mars2020/multimedia/audio/

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February 18, 2021

Fasman’s Finds – Africans With Mainframes

Fasman’s Finds is our column from Rebecca Fasman (intrepid record nerd, DJ, and curator at the Kinsey Institute) in which she shares what she’s listening to and why. 

I’ve recently revisited one of my favorite albums from 2016, K.M.T. by Africans With Mainframes. The Chicago-based duo consists of two acid house producers, Jamal Moss and Noleian Reusse, and at points the album is so intense that it becomes overwhelming, in the driving, pounding beats and unrelenting energy. The pair uses distortion, fuzz, and undulating layers of noise to tremendous and cinematic effect. The tracks get trippy as soon as you’re almost at your breaking point, and these textural variations that change from moment to moment bring you deep into the music. The track above is the most mellow on the album; it is at times lush and juicy, and dark and fuzzed out. I can’t quite get over how deeply I end up listening when I put on this album. 

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